Newspaper Tech

Electronic tablets, newspaper design and newspaper technology, past and present

Thanks to the folks who put these videos on YouTube or other video-sharing services.


Tablet Demo: Sports Illustrated


Knight-Ridder Tablet Prototype, 1994


TED Talk by newspaper designer Jacek Utko


Michael Moore on newspaper capitalism

For students adding video to WordPress sites: Those were all YouTube videos, which WordPress.com embeds using a special “youtube” address code. You are, of course, at the mercy of the owner of the YouTube account that uploaded the video, if you did not do it yourself.

A UK newspaper responds to the introduction of the iPhone/iPad two ways (Two ads from 2009, one from 2012):

Another UK paper demos its app:

The New York Daily News tablet edition:

And videos from the UK company behind it:

And Rupert Murdoch’s iPad only news thing, The Daily:

The free hosting at WordPress.com does not allow embeddable media-player codes from many other sites. One work-around is an intermediary video hosting site and plugin called “VodPod,” but I’ve had mixed results with it. Here are some attempts… If a video player does not appear, follow the link to VodPod’s copy, and from there to the original.

First, a promotional piece about the Freedom Forum Diversity Institute’s workshop on multimedia journalism, which I attended in summer 2009.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

This isn’t a new video, but I’m posting it to test the Vodpod-to-Wordpress connection:

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Here’s a problem one:

From the Prelinger collection of “ephemeral film” at archive.org, “Seventeen Days” is a New York Daily News color documentary about a New York City newspaper delivery drivers’ strike in 1945, especially interesting to media historians because the strike showed how strongly readers’ valued their favorite newspapers. (Vodpod’s video player should appear here; if it does not, follow the link below to see the film on a separate page.)

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Fortunately, someone has divided the “Seventeen Days” film into three five-and-a-half-minute parts and uploaded it to YouTube, which inspired me to create a whole page about it, with more information about the film’s contents. See it here.

Newspaper Production, 1970s

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